jolek78

linux is poetry. but it's a secret

When you put something Online, you should expect some bot attacks. Nothing to be worried about. You need just to identify the attacker ip's, and to block them. That's an easy task.

Let's see how to do it.

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So, you created your TorRelay, you verified everything, you have your fingerprint, and you can find your stats on the TorMetrics page

https://metrics.torproject.org/rs.html.

Now you need to access to your NFS storage from your RPi. Your ip now is public... Is that a good idea? No, definitely not.

Anyway, let's play. We can remove it later.

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If you access to your RPi via console, and you don't need X, this is already a good reason to remove Gnome on your Centos system.

But, there is another reason why: have you ever tried to analyze how much memory is eating the gnome-shell ?

Well...

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If you run the Relay without checking the open ports, there is a huge chance that Tor won't start properly. After getting the error, it's time to change some Iptablables rules, and to restart Tor.

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Something to check frequently, in order to avoid any issue on your RaspberryPi, is the cpu/gpu temperature. Usually, on a Linux system, comes in handy the lm_sensors package. But, on the Centos-Arm system, something is broken.

Anyway, on Linux, everything has a fix

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It could happen that the sd memory card on your RaspberryPi will gets out of space. It's time, then, to enlarge your root partition.

Let's see how.

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When you start this project, is a good idea to start Tor as a daemon. There is no reason why we should start this as a simple application.

Let's see how.

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If you run a Raspbian, and, you try to transform your Raspberry-Pi into a Tor Relay, should be quite easy. But, if you decide to install a Centos-Arm system, well, there are some tricky steps that needs to be done.

I sincerely hope that could be helpful for someone around the web...

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The Onion Routing project is a simple representation how the www should be. Born in the late 1995, the Onion project became popular thanks to a group of engineers of Naval Research Lab. The idea was quite simple, and quite complex to realize: create a net, under the common net, protected by “layers” (that's the reason behind the Onion metaphor). Basically a decentralized network. Under a group of socked connections, able to let you jump from one anonymous layer to another, the idea was to make difficult to trace you.

Anonymity was (and is) the keystone.

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I was young and, at that time, I didn't know anything about IT. One of my friend introduced me into one of the first Linux group in Emilia Romagna. Composed by several crazy guys capable, for me, to do the magic with the keyboard, I started to be aware of this weird “so called” world of open source. And during a Linux meeting, I met Renzo Davoli, associate professor of “open source technologies” in Bologna. After a couple of beers, some salted peanuts, another couple of beers, and another bunch of salted peanuts, I learned one important lesson.

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